Only a fifth of the British public trust MPs to " tell the truth " as an impact of the expenses scandal in Westminster, a new research shows.
According to a study for the Committee on Standards in Public Life watchdog, faith in MPs in England dropped to just 20 percent by 2010 and it has not risen so far, while the figure was 31 percent in 2004,The Daily Mail reported. The survey also found that 45 percent of the public believe politicians are using power for personal gain. Moreover, it was revealed that only 27 percent see MPs as “dedicated to doing a good job for the public”, down from 46 percent in 2008, a year before it emerged that dozens of MPs had misused their expenses. The total bill for MPs’ expenses increased to £98.1 million in 2012, compared to £95.4 million in 2009, when the expenses scandal was exposed. “There is no reason to assume that individuals who are currently skeptical could not become more hopeful in their perception and evaluation of politics and governance,” said Mark Philp, chairman of the committee’s research advisory board. Last month, scores of British MPs were accused of channeling thousands of pounds of taxpayers’ money into their own parties. Earlier in May, MPs were also reported to be prepared for a dramatic future pay rise of around £10,000. The Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority (Ipsa) was said to be considering a £10,000 rise in MPs salaries from £65,738 to more than £75,000 a year.