90 women from Chechnya have joined rebel groups in Syria under a Fatwa called Jihad al-Nikah (interim marriage with the fighters) to become their concubines, informed sources in Turkey said, adding that they have flown from Britain and other European cities to Istanbul in Turkey and then to Syria. "Following a Fatwa (religious decree) by the Wahhabi muftis on Jihad al-Nikah, 90 Chechnyan women went to Hatai border city from Istanbul and entered Syria via the land borders and joined the Salafi groups," the sources told FNA on Sunday. The sources said that the Chechnyan women, who bore British and other European nationalities, flew to Turkey and went to Syria to join the terrorist groups. "These women plan to become the concubines of the rebels and terrorist groups members," the sources added. Recently, some radical clerics in Saudi Arabia and Qatar have been intesifying their rhetoric against the Syrian government and called for Jihad against the Syrian people. A senior cleric of Egypt's powerful al-Azhar University denounced the recent divisive remarks by the Saudi muftis. Sheikh Mansour Mandour said in June that Saudi cleric Muhammad Al Arefi had expressed his personal views when he urged support for insurgency in Syria. The Saudi sheikh stirred controversy by calling for "Jihad" in Syria. Sheikh Mandour, however, said the Saudi's cleric's comments should be judged by the criteria set in the Holy Quran and Prophet's teachings. The al-Azhar cleric said Muslims need to be sensitive about attacks on their fellow Muslims, whether Shiite or Sunni. He called for a ban on the preaching of radical figures who sow discord among Muslims and pit Islamic nations against each other. Syria has been experiencing unrest since March 2011 with organized attacks by well-armed gangs against Syrian police forces and border guards being reported across the country. Hundreds of people, including members of the security forces, have been killed, when some protest rallies turned into armed clashes. The government blames outlaws, saboteurs, and armed terrorist groups for the deaths, stressing that the unrest is being orchestrated from abroad. In October 2011, calm was almost restored in the Arab state after President Assad started a reform initiative in the country, but Israel, the US and its Arab allies sought hard to bring the country into chaos through any possible means. Tel Aviv, Washington and some Arab capitals have been staging various plots to topple President Bashar al-Assad, who is well known in the world for his anti-Israeli stances.