A senior leader of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine warned the US and its allies, specially Israel, to avoid a military attack on Syria, stressing that Palestinian resistance groups will join the Damascus army in case of a foreign military aggression. "We won't remain in the camps if Syria is attacked," Ahmed Jibril said in an interview with al-Mayadin news channel on Saturday. Jibril said that the US has sought a military strike on Syria since 2003, and mentioned that the Syrian crisis at present is the result of a foreign plot. He said that Palestinian groups are not afraid of war and are ready for any type of combat against Israel if the latter dares to attack Syria. Meantime, he criticized certain Palestinian groups for accompanying armed opposition groups outside Syria by attending their gatherings in certain Arab states, including the Qatari capital city of Doha, and said, "The path to the liberation of Palestine doesn't pass through Doha." Syria has been experiencing unrest since March 2011 with organized attacks by well-armed gangs against Syrian police forces and border guards being reported across the country. The US and its western and regional allies have long sought to topple Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his ruling system. Media reports said that the Syrian rebels and terrorist groups have received significantly more and better weapons in recent weeks, a crime paid for by the Persian Gulf Arab states and coordinated by the United States. The US daily, Washington Post, reported in May that the Syrian rebels and terrorist groups battling Assad's government have received significantly more and better weapons in recent weeks, a crime paid for by the Persian Gulf Arab states and coordinated by the United States. The newspaper, quoting opposition activists and US and foreign officials, reported that Obama administration officials emphasized the administration has expanded contacts with opposition military forces to provide the Persian Gulf nations with assessments of rebel credibility and command-and-control infrastructure. Opposition activists who several months ago said the rebels were running out of ammunition said in May that the flow of weapons - most bought on the black market in neighboring countries or from elements of the Syrian military in the past - has significantly increased after a decision by Saudi Arabia, Qatar and other Persian Gulf states to provide millions of dollars in funding each month.